Welcome to my science blog. It is mostly a general science blog that consists almost entirely of reblogs, however I will occasionally post original content about what may pique my interest at the moment. I occasionally make posts that aren't really science-related so if you don't want to see that, feel free to Tumblr savior the tags #personal or #not science.

 

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back
Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.
"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."
Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.
While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.
That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.
But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.
He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”
Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.
Continue reading.
Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back

Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.

"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."

Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.

While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.

That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.

But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.

He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”

Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.

Continue reading.

Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Volcanoes seem to be a common topic these days. Yesterday Nautilus published a great piece by Aatish Bhatia on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, which tore the island apart and unleashed a sound so loud it was heard more than 4800 km away:

The British ship Norham Castle was 40 miles from Krakatoa at the time of the explosion. The ship’s captain wrote in his log, “So violent are the explosions that the ear-drums of over half my crew have been shattered. My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgement has come.”
In general, sounds are caused not by the end of the world but by fluctuations in air pressure. A barometer at the Batavia gasworks (100 miles away from Krakatoa) registered the ensuing spike in pressure at over 2.5 inches of mercury1,2. That converts to over 172 decibels of sound pressure, an unimaginably loud noise. To put that in context, if you were operating a jackhammer you’d be subject to about 100 decibels. The human threshold for pain is near 130 decibels, and if you had the misfortune of standing next to a jet engine, you’d experience a 150 decibel sound. (A 10 decibel increase is perceived by people as sounding roughly twice as loud.) The Krakatoa explosion registered 172 decibels at 100 miles from the source. This is so astonishingly loud, that it’s inching up against the limits of what we mean by “sound.” #

Those are some mindbogglingly enormous numbers. Aatish does a wonderful job of explaining the science behind an explosion whose effects ricocheted through the atmosphere for days afterward. Check out the full article over at Nautilus.  (Image credit: Parker & Coward, via Wikipedia)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Volcanoes seem to be a common topic these days. Yesterday Nautilus published a great piece by Aatish Bhatia on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, which tore the island apart and unleashed a sound so loud it was heard more than 4800 km away:

The British ship Norham Castle was 40 miles from Krakatoa at the time of the explosion. The ship’s captain wrote in his log, “So violent are the explosions that the ear-drums of over half my crew have been shattered. My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgement has come.”

In general, sounds are caused not by the end of the world but by fluctuations in air pressure. A barometer at the Batavia gasworks (100 miles away from Krakatoa) registered the ensuing spike in pressure at over 2.5 inches of mercury1,2. That converts to over 172 decibels of sound pressure, an unimaginably loud noise. To put that in context, if you were operating a jackhammer you’d be subject to about 100 decibels. The human threshold for pain is near 130 decibels, and if you had the misfortune of standing next to a jet engine, you’d experience a 150 decibel sound. (A 10 decibel increase is perceived by people as sounding roughly twice as loud.) The Krakatoa explosion registered 172 decibels at 100 miles from the source. This is so astonishingly loud, that it’s inching up against the limits of what we mean by “sound.” #

Those are some mindbogglingly enormous numbers. Aatish does a wonderful job of explaining the science behind an explosion whose effects ricocheted through the atmosphere for days afterward. Check out the full article over at Nautilus.  (Image credit: Parker & Coward, via Wikipedia)

ted:

The highest summit of Mount Kilimanjaro was once completely covered in ice. But since 1912, more than 80% of the mountain’s ice cover has melted, disappearing at an even faster rate in recent decades. Photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s aerial photographs show how climate change has impacted the environment. He says, "It’s too late to be pessimistic — really too late. We have to be a part of the solution."

Watch his talk for more stunning photos »

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Saturday morning Japan’s Mount Ontake erupted unexpectedly, sending a pyroclastic flow streaming down the mountain. Many, though sadly not all, of the volcano’s hikers and visitors survived the eruption. Pyroclastic flows are fast-moving turbulent and often super-heated clouds filled with ash and poisonous gases. They can reach speeds of 700 kph and temperatures of 1000 degrees C. The usual gases released in a pyroclastic flow are denser than air, causing the cloud to remain near the ground. This is problematic for those trying to escape because the poisonous gases can fill the same low-lying areas in which survivors shelter. Heavy ashfall from the flow can destroy buildings or cause mudslides, and the fine volcanic glass particles in the ash are dangerous to inhale. The sheer power and scale of these geophysical flows is stunning to behold. Those who have witnessed it firsthand and survived are incredibly fortunate. For more on the science and history of Mount Ontake, see this detailed write-up at io9. (Image credits: A. Shimbun, source video; K. Terutoshi, source video; via io9)

rhamphotheca:

These cute little guys are giant African Giant Pouched Rats (Cricetomys spp.), and they’re being trained in Tanzania to sniff out land mines and tuberculosis in war-ravaged countries. And don’t panic – these ‘hero rats’ are too light to set off any buried explosives! Find out more: BBC News
(via: ScienceAlert)

rhamphotheca:

These cute little guys are giant African Giant Pouched Rats (Cricetomys spp.), and they’re being trained in Tanzania to sniff out land mines and tuberculosis in war-ravaged countries. And don’t panic – these ‘hero rats’ are too light to set off any buried explosives!

Find out more: BBC News

(via: ScienceAlert)

rhamphotheca:

The Grey-headed Albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) is an endangered  albatross of the Southern Ocean, averaging 81 cm (32 in) in length and 2.2 m (7.2 ft) in wingspan, which breeds further south than any other mollymawk. Though its common name derives from the species’ ashy-grey head, throat and upper neck, the scientific name is a reference to the bright golden streaks on its bill.

Photographs: adult - JJ Harrison; chick - Ben Tullis

(via: Wikipedia)

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.
Also see Curie on science and wonder. 

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.

Also see Curie on science and wonder

libutron:

Kaiser’s Nudibranch - Polycera kaiserae
Described in 2007 from Bahia de Banderas in the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Polycera kaiserae (Nudibranchia - Polyceridae) is a beautiful nudibranch often found swimming in underwater caves. Although nudibranchs in general are known for their striking jewel-like colors, this species is particularly distinctive for its white polka dots on a pink body with navy blue tips. 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Alicia Hermosillo | Locality: Bahía de Banderas, Nayarit/Jalisco, Mexico (2009)

libutron:

Kaiser’s Nudibranch - Polycera kaiserae

Described in 2007 from Bahia de Banderas in the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Polycera kaiserae (Nudibranchia - Polyceridae) is a beautiful nudibranch often found swimming in underwater caves. Although nudibranchs in general are known for their striking jewel-like colors, this species is particularly distinctive for its white polka dots on a pink body with navy blue tips. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Alicia Hermosillo | Locality: Bahía de Banderas, Nayarit/Jalisco, Mexico (2009)

rhamphotheca:

Andinobates geminisae: 
New Poison Dart Frog Species Discovered In Panama
by Science 2.0 News Staff
A bright orange poison dart frog with a unique call was discovered in Donoso, Panama, and described by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí in Panama, and the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. Andinobates geminisae is named for Geminis Vargas, “the beloved wife of [coauthor] Marcos Ponce, for her unconditional support of his studies of Panamanian herpetology.” 
Every new species name is based on a representative specimen. The specimen for this species was collected Feb. 21, 2011, in the headwaters of the Rio Caño, in the district of Donoso, Colón Province, Panama, by Samuel Valdés, who was then the MWH Global Inc. environment office director, and his field assistant, Carlos de la Cruz…
(read more: Science 2.0)

rhamphotheca:

Andinobates geminisae:

New Poison Dart Frog Species Discovered In Panama

by Science 2.0 News Staff

A bright orange poison dart frog with a unique call was discovered in Donoso, Panama, and described by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí in Panama, and the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia.

Andinobates geminisae is named for Geminis Vargas, “the beloved wife of [coauthor] Marcos Ponce, for her unconditional support of his studies of Panamanian herpetology.” 

Every new species name is based on a representative specimen. The specimen for this species was collected Feb. 21, 2011, in the headwaters of the Rio Caño, in the district of Donoso, Colón Province, Panama, by Samuel Valdés, who was then the MWH Global Inc. environment office director, and his field assistant, Carlos de la Cruz…

(read more: Science 2.0)