rhamphotheca:

Bats Can Navigate using Polarized Light
by Sid Perkins
Forget the phrase “blind as a bat.” New experiments suggest that members of one species of these furry flyers—Myotis myotis, the greater mouse-eared bat—can do something no other mammal is known to do: They detect and use polarized light to calibrate their long-distance navigation.
Previous research hinted that these bats reset their magnetic compass each night based on cues visible at sunset, but the particular cue or cues hadn’t been identified. In the new study, researchers placed bats in boxes in which the polarization of light could be controlled and shifted.
After letting the bats experience sundown at a site near their typical roost, the team waited until after midnight (when polarized light was no longer visible in the sky), transported the animals to two sites between 20 and 25 kilometers from the roost, strapped radio tracking devices to them, and then released them…
(read more: Science News/AAAS)
photo by Top-Pics/TBK

rhamphotheca:

Bats Can Navigate using Polarized Light

by Sid Perkins

Forget the phrase “blind as a bat.” New experiments suggest that members of one species of these furry flyers—Myotis myotis, the greater mouse-eared bat—can do something no other mammal is known to do: They detect and use polarized light to calibrate their long-distance navigation.

Previous research hinted that these bats reset their magnetic compass each night based on cues visible at sunset, but the particular cue or cues hadn’t been identified. In the new study, researchers placed bats in boxes in which the polarization of light could be controlled and shifted.

After letting the bats experience sundown at a site near their typical roost, the team waited until after midnight (when polarized light was no longer visible in the sky), transported the animals to two sites between 20 and 25 kilometers from the roost, strapped radio tracking devices to them, and then released them…

(read more: Science News/AAAS)

photo by Top-Pics/TBK

(via shychemist)

My Kubrow is mature now, well she matured yesterday.

And my god she grew into a beefcake. I expected her to be skinny because all the images I’ve seen had big beefy males, and skinny females. (Which made me think there was some form of sexual dimorphism going on….)

Nope, not my girl. Maybe I’ll post a screenshot when I get to my desktop….?…

dendroica:

Christmas Tree Worm, Spirobranchus giganteus. (by AlistairKiwi)
Solomon Islands.

dendroica:

Christmas Tree Worm, Spirobranchus giganteus. (by AlistairKiwi)

Solomon Islands.

(via scienceyoucanlove)

rhamphotheca:

Gut Microbes Help Packrats Eat Poison
by Ashley Jaeger



Packrats can repeatedly eat poison if they have the right gut microbes.
Scientists had suspected this, but there wasn’t much evidence to support the idea, so a team decided to test it in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). Some populations of this species snack on a bush called creosote, which is toxic, while other groups leave it alone. When the creosote-eaters were given antibiotics, their gut microbes changed so that they couldn’t metabolize the toxins from bush. And when non-creosote-eaters were given fecal transplants from those that could eat the bush, the non-eaters could ingest more of the toxin.
The results, published July 20 in Ecology Letters, suggest that gut microbes expand the range of what planting-eating mammals can munch on and that  microbes may one day help livestock broaden their menu too.
(via: Science News)
photo by Kevin Kohl/University of Utah

rhamphotheca:

Gut Microbes Help Packrats Eat Poison

by Ashley Jaeger

Packrats can repeatedly eat poison if they have the right gut microbes.

Scientists had suspected this, but there wasn’t much evidence to support the idea, so a team decided to test it in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). Some populations of this species snack on a bush called creosote, which is toxic, while other groups leave it alone. When the creosote-eaters were given antibiotics, their gut microbes changed so that they couldn’t metabolize the toxins from bush. And when non-creosote-eaters were given fecal transplants from those that could eat the bush, the non-eaters could ingest more of the toxin.

The results, published July 20 in Ecology Letters, suggest that gut microbes expand the range of what planting-eating mammals can munch on and that  microbes may one day help livestock broaden their menu too.

(via: Science News)

photo by Kevin Kohl/University of Utah

rhamphotheca:

Monk Parakeets in Southern Texas
Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus), originally from South America, seem to be found with increasing frequency throughout the U.S. Large numbers have nested for quite some time in north central Austin, in the light fixtures of a soccer field, and they’re seen regularly around Houston. Photographer and birdwatcher, Bill Supulski, spotted this one at the Hidalgo Pump House near Alamo, TX (in the Lower Rio Grande Valley) a few days ago. Up to 8 of these birds have been spotted there lately. 
(via: Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival)

rhamphotheca:

Monk Parakeets in Southern Texas

Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus), originally from South America, seem to be found with increasing frequency throughout the U.S. Large numbers have nested for quite some time in north central Austin, in the light fixtures of a soccer field, and they’re seen regularly around Houston. Photographer and birdwatcher, Bill Supulski, spotted this one at the Hidalgo Pump House near Alamo, TX (in the Lower Rio Grande Valley) a few days ago. Up to 8 of these birds have been spotted there lately.

(via: Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival)

libutron:

Black-headed python
The distinctive Black-headed python, Aspidites melanocephalus (Pythonidae), does indeed have a black head and neck, which contrasts strongly with the brown banding along its body. The banding is light to dark brown or orange-brown on a base that can be creamy white, light brown and occasionally even yellow (as shown in the photo).
It is a large python (up to 250 cm length), endemic to Australia, found in Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia.
Etymology: Aspidites means ‘shield-bearer’, referring to the large scales on the head; and melanocephalus means ’black-headed’.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos
Locality: Australia

libutron:

Black-headed python

The distinctive Black-headed python, Aspidites melanocephalus (Pythonidae), does indeed have a black head and neck, which contrasts strongly with the brown banding along its body. The banding is light to dark brown or orange-brown on a base that can be creamy white, light brown and occasionally even yellow (as shown in the photo).

It is a large python (up to 250 cm length), endemic to Australia, found in Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia.

Etymology: Aspidites means ‘shield-bearer’, referring to the large scales on the head; and melanocephalus means ’black-headed’.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: Australia

(via rhamphotheca)

womenrockscience:

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community
New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.
Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.
Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.
She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

It has to be said, teenage girls are kind of killing it right now!

womenrockscience:

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community

New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.

Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.

Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.

She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

It has to be said, teenage girls are kind of killing it right now!

(via frostneko)

scienceyoucanlove:

These condoms include Vivagel, a new antiviral compound that disables 99.9% of HIV, herpes, and other sexually transmitted viruses:http://bit.ly/1ne3B9V
from Science Alert

scienceyoucanlove:

These condoms include Vivagel, a new antiviral compound that disables 99.9% of HIV, herpes, and other sexually transmitted viruses:http://bit.ly/1ne3B9V

from Science Alert