libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch
Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutes. The bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom. 
The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.
There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.
Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  
Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.
Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 
1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.
2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.
3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 
When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch

Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutesThe bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom

The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.

There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.

Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  

Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.

Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 

1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.

2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.

3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 

When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

I’m not sure what to title this….so uh yeah leaving it blank.

Anyways, so I guess I can safely say that I’ve been working at my new job for almost two months now and it’s a huge improvement over my Fast Food job. I’m not as tired after my shifts, even if they are closing shifts.

Anyways, I really like working Hardlines, but I really, really, really fucking hate being called up to be a backup cashier.

Because I’m not an actual Cashier, just someone who’s cashier-trained, I don’t know the policies regarding Coupons and whatnot like the back of my hand. So unlike the other legitimate cashiers, I kind of rely on the Cash register to catch Coupon-Abuse for me, I know you’re not supposed to, but because I’m not as good at catching coupon abuse, I just plain don’t know any better because I’m not as well practiced and don’t know what to look for….

The lady in charge of our Assets Protection said to me many times that if I need more training, I should feel free to ask….but anytime I even contemplate that I might want more training or even a refresher on my training….I can’t help but think of my two and a half week long stint at Mooyah….In which I literally got screamed at by the General Manager for simply asking to be trained on the Cash register or how to answer the phone to take call-in orders…

In fact….I am legitimately afraid of approaching any sort of management at work because of the two weeks of abuse I dealt with at Mooyah….I am literally scared that I’m going to get screamed at for wanting more training because at Mooyah I literally asked for more cashier training and the manager chewed me out simply because I asked how to give discounts through the register because my trainer didn’t show me…

I’m writing this because it bothers me that everytime I go to the registers to answer a call for backup, I’m always stuck with the people who bring binders of fucking coupons to the store and I can never tell if it’s someone being thrifty with their coupons and money…..or if it’s someone who’s committing coupon abuse…..

It’s even worse with our deals about if you buy “X” amount of an item, you get a 5$ gift card, and people will take advantage of that by getting say….6 items, in an attempt to get 3 5 dollar gift cards, the limit per purchase tends to be two, so people will separate the 5th and 6th items from the first 4….but, store policy dictates that that is not allowed because it causes the store to lose money (due to giving out so many gift cards) and stock that could go to other guests. However the limit to how many gift cards a guest can get per purchase from these deals varies from item to item….(most of the time it’s two though)

Again…I never know what to look for except for when they try to separate the purchase into two or three purchases…

But I’m also completely terrified of asking for more training because I don’t want a repeat of what I dealt with at Mooyah….

dichotomized:

Masks worn by doctors during the Plague. The protective suit of the plague doctor consisted of a heavy fabric overcoat that was waxed, a mask with glass eye openings and a cone nose shaped like a beak to hold scented substances and straw.

dichotomized:

Masks worn by doctors during the Plague. The protective suit of the plague doctor consisted of a heavy fabric overcoat that was waxed, a mask with glass eye openings and a cone nose shaped like a beak to hold scented substances and straw.

(via scienceyoucanlove)

humanoidhistory:

The clouds of Saturn, observed by the Voyager 2 space probe in 1981: “The extensive ribbonlike cloud structure in Saturn’s atmosphere is visible in this Voyager 2 green-filter photograph, obtained Aug. 23 from a range of 2.5 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). Some Voyager scientists have interpreted the ribbon to be a large-scale atmospheric wave; it is believed to lie in a rapid eastward-moving jet stream. The presence of vortices adjacent to the ribbon itself will help scientists understand the relationship between such structures and the strong jet-streams present in Saturn’s atmosphere. The smallest features visible in this photograph measure about 50 km. (30 mi.) across.”

humanoidhistory:

The clouds of Saturn, observed by the Voyager 2 space probe in 1981: “The extensive ribbonlike cloud structure in Saturn’s atmosphere is visible in this Voyager 2 green-filter photograph, obtained Aug. 23 from a range of 2.5 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). Some Voyager scientists have interpreted the ribbon to be a large-scale atmospheric wave; it is believed to lie in a rapid eastward-moving jet stream. The presence of vortices adjacent to the ribbon itself will help scientists understand the relationship between such structures and the strong jet-streams present in Saturn’s atmosphere. The smallest features visible in this photograph measure about 50 km. (30 mi.) across.”

(via fuckyeah-stars)

rtamerica:

Feds want to repopulate US with genetically pure bison
The United States Interior Department is moving forward for now with a plan that could someday re-populate a large portion of America with herds of wild bison unlike anything seen since the 1800s.
On Wednesday, officials at Yellowstone National Park said they’ll start asking for comments concerning an Interior Department proposal that would quarantine herds of bison to eliminate the spread of a certain disease, and then eventually relocate the healthy animals to ranges across the US.

rtamerica:

Feds want to repopulate US with genetically pure bison

The United States Interior Department is moving forward for now with a plan that could someday re-populate a large portion of America with herds of wild bison unlike anything seen since the 1800s.

On Wednesday, officials at Yellowstone National Park said they’ll start asking for comments concerning an Interior Department proposal that would quarantine herds of bison to eliminate the spread of a certain disease, and then eventually relocate the healthy animals to ranges across the US.

(via scienceyoucanlove)

cosmo-nautic:

Streams of charged particles blasted from the sun collide with Saturn’s magnetic field, creating a wonderful Aurora, that unlike Earth’s relatively short-lived Auroras, Saturn´s can last for days.
Credit: NASA,ESA, J Clarke (Boston University) and Z. Levay (STScl)

cosmo-nautic:

Streams of charged particles blasted from the sun collide with Saturn’s magnetic field, creating a wonderful Aurora, that unlike Earth’s relatively short-lived Auroras, Saturn´s can last for days.

Credit: NASA,ESA, J Clarke (Boston University) and Z. Levay (STScl)

(via fuckyeah-stars)

heythereuniverse:

Geometrical Geology | Mario Gutiérrez Photographer

A flysch is a sequence of sedimentary rocks that is deposited in a deep marine facies in the foreland basin of a developing orogen. Flysch is typically deposited during an early stage of the orogenesis. When the orogen evolves the foreland basin becomes shallower and molasse is deposited on top of the flysch. It is therefore called a syn-orogenic sediment (deposited contemporaneously with mountain building).

[Wikipedia]

In the town of Zumaia along the Basque coast, northern Spain, are two beaches that contain a geologic treasure that contains millions of years of the Earth’s history.

The Itzurun and Santiago beaches are hotspots for geologists because it houses one of the longest continuous rock strata in the world called a ‘flysch.” This flysch in Zumaia was found to have formed over a period of over 100 million years by the crashing of the waves against the cliffs. The result is an abrasion platform with alternate hard layers (limestone and sandstone) and soft layers (clay and loam). The flysch extends eastward and westward from Zumaia, stretching a total of 8 kilometers to the towns of Deba and Getaria.

Apart from the impressive rock formations, Zumaia also harbors important fossil evidences. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, a rock layer that marks the end of the Mesozoic era and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, is found in Itzurun beach. Fossils of ammonites, ancient molluscs resemblant of the nautilus, are also found in the rock layer.

[Read more]

(via scinerds)

mindblowingscience:

The 5 Massive New Telescopes That Will Change Astronomy Forever

The biggest building boom in the history of astronomy is upon us. In Chile and Hawaii and in space, astronomers are getting powerful telescopes that dwarf the current state-of-the-art instruments. When the mountain blasting and the mirror polishing are all done, we will have the clearest and most detailed views of outer space ever.

This boom has long been in the works for years, as billion-dollar telescopes don’t just fund and plan themselves.Now, these telescopes are starting to break ground. “If it all plays out as expected and budgeted,” writes Dennis Overbye in the New York Times, “astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground.” Let’s take a closer took at what these billion-dollar telescopes can do for astronomy in the decades to come.

Read all about these 5 amazing telescopes at Gizmodo

(via infinity-imagined)

So I have a second little fluffy bundle of fur

I’m a little disappointed that it has the same Tiger stripe pattern that my other one does, but the Steel Gray with Black stripes are neat as hell.